The Quiet Time

The Quiet Time

The Quiet Time

 

IOIO friends meet Kim Zarney. Born in Medina, Ohio, Kim Zarney attended Syracuse University and earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Painting and Printmaking from the Cleveland Institute of Art.
For the past 40 years, Zarney has worked as an illustrator, graphic designer and advertising agency creative director. Highlights of his marketing communications career include a London International Advertising award for retail packaging he designed for Anchor Hocking Glass and Package Design Council International and International Brand Packaging awards for retail packaging he designed for Little Giant Pumps line of Pondworks water garden products. As an illustrator, his work was accepted and displayed in two Society of Illustrators Annual Exhibitions in New York and included in the Society’s printed annuals.
Now working as a full-time painter, Zarney has spent the past several years developing and refining his monochromatic style. His abstract landscapes are included in numerous public and private collections.

IOIO Studio will be hosting Kim Zarney Exhibit at IOIO Studio now through March 2017. Please join us for his opening night

Tuesday January 31st from 5-7pm.

Casual night with friends enjoying a beautiful art.

 

The Foliage is gone and the underbrush is tangled and muted. Hillsides open up to reveal graphic shapes and patterns hidden from view all summer. The entire landscape becomes a wonderful sculpture. Everything is simplified and reduced to its basic components.
As an artist, this is when I enjoy being outside with my camera and sketchbook. Late fall, the cold winter months, and the very early days of spring. I call it the quiet time.
Winter light is different, too. The lower angle of the sun penetrates deep into the woods casting warm highlights and long, cool shadows. Add snow and the visuals become even more dramatic, with all the natural elements silhouetted in a beautiful, abstract world.
Like the subject matter, my color palette is kept simple. Using water-soluble oils on coated paper, I work quickly to develop the initial layers of line, texture and tone. The versatility of this medium allows me to work back through sections of wet paint with a variety of brushes, sharpened twigs, sponges, rags, palette knives, and even my fingers.
Each finished monochromatic piece has a life and vitality all its own.

No Comments

Post A Comment